SAMIC 2017: 5-7 April
SAMIC 2017 / Why Attend
Introduction

SAMIC 2017 has set specific key objectives to achieve. They include:

  • Arrange and sustain strategic conversations among industry, government, investors, entrepreneurs, academia and civil society on developing South Africa’s oceans economy – talking about skills development, investment and funding, research and innovation, and socio-economic transformation.
  • Profile and market South African and African opportunities for investment.
  • Establish a national collaborative framework for a partnership of the maritime industry, academia, research institutions, entrepreneurs, funders and investors to realise the maritime sector’s economic growth and job creation potential.
  • Support the mainstreaming of women in the development agenda for the maritime sector and create the necessary institutional mechanisms to achieve this.

In support of these objectives, the SAMIC 2017 programme will focus on six areas deemed the most likely to have significant positive impacts on maritime economic sector development, both immediately as well as into the future:

  • Reflections on progress made with objectives set at SAMIC 2012.
  • Update on Operation Phakisa (Oceans Economy), specifically opportunities for private sector participation.
  • Maritime business investment and funding.
  • Towards an Industry-Education Skills and Jobs Partnership in the maritime sector.
  • Progress on Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in the maritime sector.
  • Mainstreaming the participation of women in the development of the maritime sector in South Africa and Africa.
An Overview of the Focus Issues / SAMIC 2012
Commitments were made at SAMIC 2012, by various sub-sectors of the maritime industry, on what needed to be done to position South Africa as a true maritime nation. SAMIC 2017 will reflect on what has been achieved since that conference in terms of the objectives set there, including:

  • Outlining South Africa’s maritime development Agenda
  • Lobbying policy makers to support the development, growth and transformation of the maritime sector
  • Engaging development financial institutions (DFIs) and private funders on supporting sector growth
  • Developing and agreeing on a roadmap and priority programmes for South Africa’s maritime sector, with a specific focus on
           • shipping, ports and logistics,
           • offshore oil and gas,
           • fishing and aquaculture,
           • marine tourism and leisure,
           • marine manufacturing and ship repairs
  • Establishing a structure to execute programmes and outcomes of the conference.

  • Supporting high-level research and innovation, particularly local development and incubation of new technologies, is as important to maritime sector growth and competitiveness as developing the skills to work in new and existing enterprises.

    SAIMI has supported the development of a Maritime Research, Innovation and Knowledge Management Roadmap for South Africa, and is now working with its author, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) to roll-out implementation with expertise and funding support for both academic research and industrial innovation.

    Launching of this Roadmap and discussion on realising research and innovation opportunities will be the subject of a dedicated session of SAMIC 2017.

  • Operation Phakisa
  • Maritime business opportunities - Investment & Funding
  • National Industry-Education Skills Partnership
  • TEVT Initiatives in SA’s Maritime Sector
  • Mainstreaming Women in the Maritime Sector in Africa

The South African government’s Operation Phakisa initiative is an innovative approach to addressing the high-level issues identified in the National Development Plan (NDP) 2030 – bringing them down to detail-level through problem analysis and priority setting, cutting across government department silos to plan interventions required and set concrete delivery targets.

Although maritime industry representatives participated in the ‘Lab’ phase of Operation Phakisa in the Oceans Economy, the focus of implementation has since shifted to government. There is a widespread need, particularly expressed by the maritime business sector, for more information about how the programme will achieve its goals. Specifically, stakeholders, role-players and interested parties, including investors, want to know how they can contribute meaningfully to solutions while also generating mutual socio-economic benefits.

The intention at SAMIC 2017 is to provide a platform for government and interested parties to meet and develop shared understanding of needs, opportunities and possibilities for mutually beneficial participation.

With some 3,000km of coastline stretching from the Atlantic Ocean and the highly productive Benguela Current in the west, to the Indian Ocean on the eastern coast, South Africa controls an exclusive economic zone larger than its land mass. The coastline is a centre of marine environmental diversity and the country is well-positioned as a global shipping hub linking Western Europe, the Americas and the countries of the Asia-Pacific region.

Seaborne transportation is supported by modern ports in Saldanha Bay, Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, East London, Durban and Richards Bay. South Africa’s vast ocean and coastal area is rich in natural resources and presents diverse investment opportunities. These range from energy (oil and gas), mineral resources, and power generation (wind, wave, solar), to production and/or harvesting and processing for pharmaceuticals and food (fisheries and aquaculture), to infrastructure development in small harbours, and tourism, watersports and leisure activities. Together these hold the potential of generating economic opportunities and thousands of much-needed jobs for the country.

Investment to date in any of these maritime economy sub-sectors, aside from commercial fishing, has been largely historically skewed and relatively subdued. The conference aims to provide a platform to highlight investment opportunities and funding prospects for business endeavours.

Numerous studies on the growth prospects of the maritime sector, as well as industry deliberations at SAMIC 2012 and subsequently, have identified a chronic skills shortage as the key constraint to economic growth and job creation in the sector. In an effort to address this with the involvement of industry, SAMSA and SAIMI commissioned Ernst & Young to develop a model for collaborative partnerships between maritime employers and education and training providers to accelerate relevant skills development in order to support competitiveness and growth for the sector.

Strong, direct industry involvement and active participation in identifying and communicating current and future skills are central to the model, which will be presented for discussion and further refinement at SAMIC 2017. The Conference provides the opportunity for industry to engage with the outcomes of the project, with the aim of moving speedily to implementation of programmes to increase the pace of, and expand, skills development and job creation.

Maritime-related education currently takes place in isolated pockets, primarily at higher education level, and does not cater for the full spectrum of skills needed by the diverse sub-sectors of the maritime economy, nor for the needs of school-leavers at differing levels. This results in limitations both in the number of potential new employees and the types and levels of skills required.

The Conference will explore current initiatives and future thinking on maritime education and training as a critical mechanism to support maritime economic growth and job creation, and specifically strengthening the capacity of education institutions – particularly at the TVET level – to deliver education and training that meets the needs of the maritime industry.

These initiatives include the work done by SAMSA in collaboration with relevant national government departments, the maritime industry, and education and training role-players to establish relevant, skills-focused programmes at TVET colleges. The objective of the exercise is to ensure that maritime-related education, training and skills development occurs at all levels, and in all areas needed by the maritime sector, in order to widen access to maritime-related careers for young South Africans.

The maritime sector – particularly in the traditional view of it being primarily to do with shipping – has been historically male-dominated, both globally and in Africa. At the same time as the maritime sector in South Africa is moving from the periphery into mainstream economic activity, attention is on its socio-economic transformation – the inclusion of and equal opportunity for all members of society.

Women empowerment and gender parity in the maritime sector is also recognised as an issue at continental level and supported by the African Union (AU). The formation of the Women in Maritime Africa (WIMA) lobby group in 2015 was timed with the AU’s declaration of the “Year of Women’s Empowerment and Development towards Africa’s Agenda 2063” and the adoption of the Africa Integrated Maritime Strategy (AIMS) 2050.

SAMIC 2017 will facilitate conversations specifically focused on the challenges facing women in the maritime sector, how to encourage and support women to take advantage of an innovative and modern maritime sector, how to achieve greater participation by women in maritime careers and business opportunities that create opportunities for economic empowerment, and policies and actions required to support these.

Conference Attendance

SAMIC 2017 aims to attract a maximum of 300 delegates from the various sub-sectors of the maritime industry, as well as researchers, academics, innovators, funders, investors, government officials and international maritime experts. Attendance is mainly by invitation.


In support of these objectives, the SAMIC 2017 programme will focus on six areas deemed the most likely to have significant positive impacts on maritime economic sector development, both immediately as well as into the future:

  • Reflections on progress made with objectives set at SAMIC 2012.
  • Update on Operation Phakisa (Oceans Economy), specifically opportunities for private sector participation.
  • Maritime business investment and funding.
  • Towards an Industry-Education Skills and Jobs Partnership in the maritime sector.
  • Progress on Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in the maritime sector.
  • Mainstreaming the participation of women in the development of the maritime sector in South Africa and Africa.

Proposed Outcomes

A collaborative programme of action for developing the sector:

  • A framework for the development of national maritime clusters.
  • To market and promote South Africa’s portfolio of maritime investments and other related industry opportunities.
  • A partnership for transforming the maritime sector by supporting women empowerment and participation in the sector.
  • SAIMI established as the apex institute and an essential partner in delivering the country and continent’s oceans economy.
  • An accelerated job creation model for the oceans economy supported by industry and academia.